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The Die Cut – Your Cookie Cutter to Creativity
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K.R.M International is a one of the best solution of Die Cut.  A die cut is created by using a sharp steel blade formed into a specific shape, then cut through the paper. Think about how a steel cookie cutter would work; just substitute the dough with paper. The shapes for die cutting are nearly limitless—circles, squares, holes, curves, stair-stepped, rounded corners, sharp points, just to name a few. The die cut form, or “die”, is usually customized to the piece it is creating, and it creates a very crisp, smooth edge that can include fine detail and a very distinctive look, which cannot be achieved with a standard cut. Take a look at the video to see die cutting in action, and the finished piece.
The products you can use die cuts on are wide ranging. Many people add eye-catching details to their business cards with die cutting, but you can also use the process on door hangers, brochures, postcards and presentation folders, to name a few.

Why you should use a Die Cut?
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die cutting sample As you look for ways to add a die cut to your piece, think about the purpose of it, and what kind of message you want to deliver. Are you looking for a classic shape, such as an effect of a family crest or scrollwork? Or perhaps something wild or unique, like the top of palm tree, a car, and the wings of a bird or even a butterfly, as seen here?
As well, your industry can provide additional creative direction. Construction companies, real estate agents or architects could use the outline of a roofline or building, restaurants perhaps could use the corner of a napkin or even a fork or basil leaf; the possibilities are nearly limitless. The real benefit of using a die cut is to get a potential customer to do a double-take, take a closer look, and check out what you have to offer. Sometimes it is that critical few seconds that can result in your business card, brochure or rack card being ignored or held onto and followed up on, just because of a unique finishing option—the multipurpose die cut.